JULY SUN is a comedy with a single set and a cast of 4 women and 3 men. On the back porch of the farmhouse in Kansas three daughters have gathered to celebrate the birthday of their mother, Mad, as they affectionately call her. They learn that she is about to be married—again. The tone is comic, but a number of old sins intrude. Beneath the volley of barbs and eccentricities of the characters lies a bedrock of wistfulness and a delicately wrought exercise in human communication. Each character tries to move from the loneliness of their private lives into some form of understanding. When the daughters find out that they each had different fathers and that one of them has been sleeping with her brother, Mad becomes their target. The truth that finally emerges invariably terrifies them, but they find strength in one another to deal with it. This is a warm, romantic comedy full of compassion and understanding and the simple poetry of the heart.

CHARACTERS

MAD Age about 50, divorced, attractive, vibrant, a fiery woman with
shoulder-length red hair who has risen above the difficulties life
has presented. She reminds me of Susan Sarandon in Bull Durham.

JENNY Her youngest daughter, about 18, pretty, strong.

BRIAN Jenny’s boyfriend, about 21, works in a garage--a real hunk.

ROSE The oldest daughter, a nurse, late 20’s, wears expensive and
tasteful clothes, intelligent, forceful, independent.

LYNN The middle daughter, about 25, was recently hit by a car while
crossing the street, limps, has bandaged legs, uses a crutch. She
wears thick glasses and is overweight.

BRENT Age about 50, widowed, distinguished, handsome, charming, well-
toned and rich. He reminds me of Pierce Brosnen..

CHARLIE Age about 45, runs a heating and cooling business. Like his son
Brian, he is a nice guy and a hunk.


SETTING

The back porch of an old two-story house in Wichita, Kansas. The white clapboard siding could use a paint job. There is a door just to the right of center stage, leading to the kitchen. It has glass in the top half. On the outside of it there is a screen door. There are large windows that look out on to the porch and allow us to see part of the kitchen inside. The other windows are blocked by white shears and drapes. We can see the bedroom windows above the porch roof. All the windows are flanked by green shutters that also need painting. Steps lead down from the porch to the back yard. There are flowers here and there, some shrubs, and trees off to the sides of the house and yard, but it is a hodge-podge. Nothing has been landscaped. On the porch is an old chair swing on stage left and a table and four chairs on the right.

TIME

Act I, Scene 1: A Saturday morning in July.
Act I, Scene 2: About an hour later.
Act II, Scene 1: Immediately following.
Act II, Scene 2: Later that afternoon.

THE STORY

On the back porch of the farm house in Kansas three daughters have gathered to celebrate the birthday of their mother, Mad, as they affectionately call her. They learn that she is about to be married—again. The tone is comic, but a number of old sins intrude. Beneath the volley of barbs and eccentricities of the characters lies a bedrock of wistfulness and a delicately wrought exercise in human communication. Each character tries to move from the loneliness of their private lives into some form of understanding. When the daughters find out that they each had different fathers, Mad becomes their target. The truth that finally emerges invariably terrifies them, but they find strength in one another to deal with it. This is a warm, romantic comedy full of compassion and understanding and the simple poetry of the heart.